Posts Tagged ‘raccoon’

More on The Bayview Beast.

Saturday, November 1st, 2008

Denise Civiletti has provided us with more information on “The Bayview Beast”. I would consider Denise a credible source because she interviewed an expert on mountain lions and performed her due diligence to write an article for a Long Island publication, “The Suffolk Times” in October of 2008.

Please see Denise’s comments below:

“The Suffolk Times first published this story on Monday Oct. 20. Unlike Newsday, which relied on interviews with officials and records, we went to the site and spoke with two eyewitnesses who saw this big cat on three different occasions, and we saw the places where the cat was seen. The guy who didn’t want us to use his last name really is named “John.” (We have his name but withheld it on his request.)

Newsday did a great disservice by making light of this sighting and likening it to the bloated carcass of a raccoon or something that washed ashore in Montauk and caused a big media sensation — your “Montauk Monster.”

In my opinion, this big cat is real and it’s probably an abandoned pet— yes, pet! Don’t make light of this! This is not uncommon. Stupid people illegally try to domesticate wild animals like this all the time. Then, when they can’t handle them, or when the novelty wears off, they release or abandon them. It’s inhumane. And potentially dangerous. This is no joke.

I interviewed one expert on mountain lions (aka cougars, pumas) this morning who said it’s not impossible for this to be a female puma living in the wild, but he thought it more likely it is an abandoned pet.”

See our story at: www.suffolktimes.com.

The Montauk Monster: Up Close and Personal.

Sunday, August 3rd, 2008

The first time I read about the “Montauk-Monster” in Newsday I was not happy with the quality of the picture. It was in black and white and the size of the image was distorted. I had to do my own due diligence and hop online and find a better quality image.

Jenna Hewitt, 26 came forward with this picture. I will post movie clips of exclusive interviews with her shortly. When I made it down to the beach that afternoon I did not see her or any of the friends she was with. Though I only spent a short time examining the creature, I did not see Jenna Hewitt at the scene that afternoon or her taking pictures of the monster. It might have been done before or after I made to the beach.

If only I got my hands on the new Apple iPhone 3G a few weeks earlier! Unfortunately, my BlackBerry doesn’t have a camera phone. There were weird pimples on its back and an odd piece of fabric around its hoof / claw. I remember this very distinctly. This picture is the real deal.

Below is an accurate representation of the Montauk Monster.It was approximately 2.5-3 feet long. To compare it to another animal it’s safe to say it was about the size a small dog. It did not resemble a dog or pitbull because the eyes and snout (or beak nose in this instance) did not look like anything from the canine family.

This is not a dead dog or raccoon. What do you think?

montauk monster

Check out some additional info below about the dead monster found in Montauk, NY:

Gawker.com

Fox News

NYMag investigates the Montauk Monster

The Montauk Monster: Listed On Wikipedia.

Sunday, August 3rd, 2008

The Montauk Monster has been loaded as a current event on Wikipedia. The information below may be incomplete, or may change as the event progresses.

The Montauk Monster is a creature with a “dinosaur beak” which allegedly washed ashore dead in Ditch Plains, near Montauk, New York in late July 2008.

Speculation in published reports included theories that the Montauk Monster may be a turtle without its shell—even though the shell of a turtle cannot be removed without damaging the turtle—a dog, a raccoon, or perhaps a science experiment from the nearby government animal testing facility, the Plum Island Animal Disease Center. The “monster” may also be a decomposed pig carcass. The creature’s appearance may have been altered through immersion in water for an extended period before coming to rest on the shore, making it difficult to identify.

Because the body is not available for study, and is only shown in photos taken by the locals who discovered it, this may be a photo-shopped image or part of a viral marketing campaign. A new picture of the creature has also been shown on the news and Internet. Animal Expert Jeff Corwin has appeared on Fox News and claimed that upon close inspection of the photograph, he feels sure the “monster” is merely a raccoon or dog that has decomposed slightly.

William Wise, director of Stony Brook University’s Living Marine Resources Institute, interpreted the photo along with a colleague, and suggested it was a hoax after discounting the following possibilities:

• Raccoon. (“The legs appear to be too long in proportion to the body.”)
• Sea turtle. (“Sea turtles do not have teeth.”)
• Rodent. (“Rodents have two huge, curved incisor teeth.”)
• Dog or other canine.(“Prominent eye ridge and the feet” don’t match.)
• Sheep. (Sheep don’t have sharp teeth).

The father of the woman who took the photo that spawned the speculation told a reporter that reports that his daughter was holding out to the highest bidder to make some cash were “nonsense.” An unidentified woman told the same reporter that the animal was only the size of a cat, and as of August 2008 was decomposed to a skeleton, but would not identify its location for inspection.

On August 1, Gawker published pictures and x-rays of a Rakali (or Water Rat, Hydromys chrysogaster) showing several convincing similarities with the Montauk Monster: the “beak”, tail, feet, size, and general appearance similar. The Rakali originates from Australia.

Posed Theories

Below is a list of proposed real-world animals that would seem to match with what the “monster” may have been before decomposing due to sea water. Some animals would seem to make more sense than others, such as a pig carcass over a turtle, while the probability of a fraud is always present. All reasonable possibilities have been listed.

• Cougar/Mountain Lion
• Wild Pig
• Dog/Wolf
• Water Rat
• Raccoon
• Sea Turtle
• Viral marketing fraud

Montauk Monster Wikipedia